9 months! Really?

It’s been almost nine months since my last blog entry. I’ve never been a prolific writer as you can see this in the gaps between posts. I think I’ve found the reason why.

Recently I came across the article Speed Matters by James Somers. Right there, in the second paragraph of the article, Somers summed up exactly my relationship with this blog:

“If every time you write a blog post it takes you six months, and you’re sitting around your apartment on a Sunday afternoon thinking of stuff to do, you’re probably not going to think of starting a blog post, because it’ll feel too expensive.”

James Somers

I feel seen.

Each time I’ve thought about writing a post, the idea comes into my head, I make a start and then… well then it doesn’t get finished. Or in the rare case it does get published it takes me hours or weeks of refinement and editing.

Each time I go round this loop, turning my next idea into text becomes harder to do. 

I’m not about to say I’m a changed man and that you can expect daily posts. However, I will aim to work more quickly, worrying less about getting the content just right before hitting publish.

And as case in point, this post only took me 10 minutes from idea to publishing. Start as you mean to go on.

Iceland – December 2018

Late in 2018, our thoughts turned to what we’d do to celebrate the end of 2018. Having had a couple of recent New Years Eve’s wiped out through illness, myself and Jo were ready to do a little more for the upcoming New Year celebrations.

Rather than spend time in the UK, we decided to book a last minute short break to Iceland. We booked through TUI, taking advantage of their pre-arranged Iceland tour packages to give us a view of the island.

Continue reading “Iceland – December 2018”

Removing Facebook (again)

Late in March 2018 I decided to delete my Facebook account.

Scheduled deletion of my Facebook account. I’d recently removed it from my phone and disabled my account. #DeleteFacebook— Steve Bennett 💬 (@stevebennett) March 20, 2018

This isn’t the first time I’d decided to do this. In 2014, as Facebook turned 10, I decided to put my own usage of the social network on pause.

This didn’t last too long and only a few months later I’d decided to reactivate my account.

In 2015, in another attempt to reduce my usage of Facebook, I removed the apps from my phone.

Purged #linkedin and #facebook from my phone.— Steve Bennett 💬 (@stevebennett) January 29, 2015

Once again, this didn’t stick and the big blue app found it’s way back onto my device. (LinkedIn is still absent though…)

Last year, a combination of factors convinced me to take more drastic action and delete my accounts on Facebook. Firstly, I was becoming aware that I was spending an increasing amount of time on the app and this time was taking me away from real personal interactions.

I was maintaining a semblance of managing relationships with people when in fact, all I was doing was observing only their personal highlights from afar. In turn, I believe that this was leading me to a false conclusion that I still had a connection with these people even though it’d probably been many, many months (years in some cases) since we last spoke. The truth is that at least for these people, any relationship or friendship I once had had now dwindled away.

Around the same time I was thinking about deleting my account, the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal hit with details of over 87 million profiles being shared between the two companies and used in political campaigning.

Zuckerberg and Facebook apologised for the breach, yet (in my opinion) were more intent on shifting the blame to Cambridge Analytica. Both parties were (once again, in my opinion) complicit in the data sharing, however Facebook granted permission for Cambridge Analytica to use the data and therefore shoulders the accountability for ensuring the data is used responsibly.

As I read more about the data breach (was it really a breach?) I became convinced that letting my Facebook account die was the right thing to do. 30 days later, my big blue account had gone.

As the news coverage and hearings surrounding the scandals continued, I looked at my usage of two other properties owned by Facebook – WhatsApp and Instagram.

Instagram was a fairly easy to remove from my life. I’d never been a big user of the service, however, in the weeks and months since deleting my Facebook account, I had replaced some of my daily feed-lurking with Instagram usage. I took the decision that the cost of being part of the Facebook ecosystem (even via Instagram) wasn’t worth it and I deleted my Instagram account later in the year.

The last stage was to remove myself from WhatsApp. This was a lot harder.

I’d been a user of WhatsApp since the paid 99c days and was really impressed with the the service and it’s approach to messaging. I had a small number of contacts which I exchanged messages with regularly and was a member of a small number of groups. Moreover, unlike my usage on Facebook and Instagram, messaging was an interactive experience and the number of people who I knew on the service was growing.

I decided to remove my WhatsApp account to evaluate alternatives. So far, I’ve tried Telegram and Signal (in addition to SMS) and whilst they’re both comparable in terms of service to WhatsApp, they just don’t have the users. I do think that I’ll be returning to WhatsApp in 2019, especially as I predict that peer-to-peer and private group messaging will start to overtake our usage of broad public social network usage.

Of course, I’m never really out of the Facebook ecosystem. My wife, parents, siblings, family members, and many of my friends all still have accounts. I still appear in photos on their streams and I’m sure that Facebook is still able to put a name to my face.

Facebook tracing cookies litter the web, so I’m pretty confident in saying that I still have a profile. However, rather than it being one that I control (or at least claim to control), it’s a darker, shadowy profile that I can’t see or delete.

And there I think lies a problem. Whilst I can do a bunch of things to remove myself from the Facebook ecosystem, I don’t think you can really ever truly escape.

So, what’s life been like Post-Facebook? I’ve found myself using messaging and email more, and I’ve made more effort to reach out to people who I’ve previously lost connection with. Having not seen everything on Facebook, I’m able to have better conversations with people when we meet. I don’t spend as long on my phone, although my Twitter usage has gone up. Overall, whilst the first few months were more difficult, I can honestly say that I don’t miss Facebook or Instagram at all.

Have I missed stuff since leaving Facebook? Undoubtedly.

Do I feel like I’m missing out? Sometimes.

Am I willing to pay the necessary price to deal with this FOMO? Absolutely not.

Moving my site to WordPress

I’ve been a SquareSpace customer for a couple of years now, having decided to restart my blogging efforts. I initially chose SquareSpace as I wanted a simple, hosted option so that I could concentrate on writing rather than configuring web servers.

I liked the ease with which I could get started with SquareSpace, and I was impressed with the templates and designs that I could choose from. I wasn’t that impressed with the post editor, but it seemed better than most of the alternatives at the time.

Whilst SquareSpace had been a good way of getting started, I became increasingly frustrated by the editor and layout tools for writing blog posts. I also realised that I wanted more of a blog “feel” for the site, and in my opinion, the best blogging tool out there is WordPress.

I started the move earlier this week by exporting the content from SquareSpace and importing it all to a new hosted WordPress.com site. After some tweaking of templates and design, I had something I was happy with, so I switched on the new stevebennett.co domain. I still have steve.codes, but feel the new domain is more appropriate.

I had a problem though. I had content and links referencing the old steve.codes blog, and needed to redirect this to my new site. There was no clear way to do this in the WordPress.com instance, so I needed to set up a tactical hack to do the redirect.

The “hack” involved setting up a new free-tier Cloudflare account. Cloudflare’s free tier gives you limited DDOS and CDN capabilities, but the only thing I really needed was access to their “Page Rules”, specifically the Redirect capability.

After pointing the steve.codes domain to the Cloudflare nameservers, I was able to set up two new Page Rules for redirecting existing content to the new WordPress site.

Screen Shot 2017-08-18 at 13.29.29

Two rules needed to be added, one to redirect the blog content, under '/blog/', and another to cover all other content. Luckily, my blog on SquareSpace used the same slug format – yyyy/mm/dd – as used by WordPress.com, making the rules much simpler.

Once added, all existing links to steve.codes were successfully redirect to the new WordPress site, and the migration was complete.

Overall moving from SquareSpace to WordPress was incredibly simple, and I’m pleased with the new site.

Career Paths and Circles

I’ve been spending a fair amount of time recently reworking our career paths. Our current documents are heavily based on the work by Radford, which defines 6 levels for each job family. Whilst our career path was very well defined and comprehensive, we are finding that the documentation is a little incomprehensible and causes difficulty as people try to self-assess their position on the career path.

Through conversations about this, it’s clear our team members want something simpler against which they could measure their progress and plan their development. This is one of my key tasks for the coming weeks, and I’ll drawing inspiration from the many public career paths that exist, such as the one from Rent the Runway.

In the meantime, in conversations with our engineers I’ve found myself boiling down the career path to a few key competencies. Two of these are impact and influence, and I’d like to focus on these here.

As I talked about the changes in expectations across I have for the impact people have, and the influence they exert across the levels, I found I need for a visual aid. So, I took to drawing a set of concentric circles on the whiteboard to demonstrate my arguments.

We start from the centre of this diagram, where we find our entry level engineers (Engineer I), and slightly further out our Engineer II’s. At these levels, your impact and influence is expected to be on an individual level, as you use your new and existing skills to be a competent individual contributor and collaborative team member. Your focus here is on growing as an engineer, taking opportunities to learn and develop new skills.

Moving outwards, our Senior Engineers are expected to have impact and influence over their individual scrum and delivery teams. At this level, you’ll be expected to be co-ordinating others to solve problems and motivate the team to achieving their goals. To do this, there’s an expectation that you’ll need to have achieved a strong base of knowledge in our products and in at least one of key technologies.

Looking to our Staff Engineer circle, this is the first time your influence and impact starts to transcend your immediate team. Here you’ll be expected to be defining the approach for not only your delivery team, but also starting to influence other members within your own discipline. For example, as a Staff Test Engineer, you could be helping to define the approach to testing RESTful services across the group.

In the Principal Engineer circle, you’ll be starting to change the agenda for the engineering group. This will involve working across boundaries of disciplines or delivery teams to define processes, practices and behaviours or to deliver large pieces of work co-ordinating amongst several groups. Alternatively, as a Principal Engineer you could be the one using specialist knowledge to solve particularly sticky issues for teams.

Finally, at the edge of the diagram we find out Distinguished Engineers. At this level, engineers are supporting technology initiatives at a company or industry level. Your impact and influence is no longer limited by the boundaries of the company, and you use your skills to drive significant change to not only the company, but also to the wider industry.

I’ve found this 5 circles approach as a good way of showing the expectations at each level in a way which is simple and understandable. It clearly shows the differences between each level, and gives people a lens with which they can better understand their own position on the career path.

In doing some research for this piece, I was pleased to see other companies use similar mechanisms to describe the progression through an engineering career path. One such example is Spotify whose process is described in “Spotify Technology Career Path”.